• Articles

    Dermatology at UVA: Expert Skin Care and Treatment

    Many centers in this country can provide exemplary care, but very few will see you as an individual. At UVA, I believe that doctors take care of you, not your disease. They think about your family. They think about what you go through to get here, and we want to make the patient experience the best it can possibly be. University of Virginia offers a multi-disciplinary option for patients who have especially complex skin cancers. We can work as a team and bring a very comprehensive, collaborative effort to achieve very good outcomes, even the more complex patients. I think it’s important to know that you’re seeing a dermatologist who…

  • Is Skin Cancer Hereditary? – Daily Do’s of Dermatology
    Articles,  Blog

    Is Skin Cancer Hereditary? – Daily Do’s of Dermatology

    So here’s another “Daily Do” from your friendly local dermatologist. So the next question is, is skin cancer hereditary? And the answer is yeah, everything is! And might not be exactly from the genetic structure that you have. It might not be exactly from similar outdoor activities, or lifestyle choices, but a combination of the two absolutely is true. The skin cancer and almost everything else is hereditary. So you share your genetic code from your parents, and if your parents burn easily in the sun, and they have an increased risk of skin cancer, then chances are your skin will burn easily, and you have an increased risk. Also…

  • This Rare Syndrome Keeps Your Skin Peeling Forever
    Articles,  Blog

    This Rare Syndrome Keeps Your Skin Peeling Forever

    Hey there! Welcome to Life Noggin! There are a number of rare conditions and diseases that people across the world deal with on a daily basis. While they may not be super visible to us because of their low frequencies, it’s important to know and learn about them. One such condition, or should I say groups of conditions, is peeling skin syndrome. Rather than being just a single thing, peeling skin syndrome is a more general term for a group of rare inherited skin disorders that are known for spontaneous and continual peeling of the skin, or exfoliation, that’s oftentimes rather painless. This is because the outermost layer of the…

  • Other Types of Skin Cancer – Daily Do’s of Dermatology
    Articles,  Blog

    Other Types of Skin Cancer – Daily Do’s of Dermatology

    So here’s another “Daily Do” from your friendly local dermatologist. So you’ve probably heard me talk a lot about the big three skin cancers and dermatologists, basal cell and squamous cell, and that makes up the umbrella of the non-melanoma skin cancers, and then the melanoma skin cancers. So those are the big three, but what other types of cancers exist? And the answer is this many. Now fortunately there’s not too many of this many out there. But you can get a cancer of almost anything. So any area of your body, any tissue, any cell can turn cancerous. You can get things called angiosarcoma that are made out…

  • Skin Cancer – Yale Medicine Explains
    Articles,  Blog

    Skin Cancer – Yale Medicine Explains

    – Nonmelanoma skin cancer represents the most common form of skin cancers. There are two main types. Basal cell cancer, the most common, and squamous cell cancer. Both of these are caused by ultraviolet light from the sun. While anybody can develop nonmelanoma skin cancer, people with light colored eyes, fair hair, fair skin, a family history of skin cancer are all at increased risk. In addition, people that have had blistering sunburns in childhood or work outdoors have an increased risk of developing nonmelanoma skin cancer. Basal cell cancer most often becomes apparent to an individual because it’s a non healing wound. A wound that bleeds, heals up and…

  • Small Bump Turned Out to be Rare Skin Cancer
    Articles,  Blog

    Small Bump Turned Out to be Rare Skin Cancer

    Two years ago I came to Dr. Hess with some sort of growth on my arm that other doctors told me not to worry about because he was my third doctor that I had had shown it to and the others were like it’s fine they’ll go away. Luckily Dr. Hess did not have the same plan. He recognized that it was something, sent it away, came back, he had to give me the news the hardest news that I’d ever had to receive; it was an aggressive form of skin cancer, very rare and a lot of doctors weren’t familiar with it, and I really credit him with saving…

  • Ozarks FOX AM-Skin Cancer Treatment Tech Kallie Report-05/22/19
    Articles,  Blog

    Ozarks FOX AM-Skin Cancer Treatment Tech Kallie Report-05/22/19

    Jeremy: WELCOME BACK TO “OZARKS FOX A.M.” IT’S SKIN CANCER AWARENESS MONTH, AND KALE KAYLIE HAS A STORY ON NEW TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE ON THE FIGHT AGAINST SKIN CANCER. THE SUN IS SHINING SOMETIMES IN MISSOURI, BUT IT ISN’T EXACTLY OUR BEST FRIEND AT TIMES. SKIN CANCER IS THE MOST COMMON FORM OF CANCER IN THE UNITED STATES, AND EACH YEAR MORE THAN 3 MILLION CASES ARE DIAGNOSED. AS WE’RE APPROACHING THE END OF SKIN CANCER AWARENESS MONTH, HERE’S A LOOK AT NEW TECHNOLOGY THAT’S QUICKER AND EASIER FOR DOCTORS AND PATIENTS TO NAVIGATE SIN SKIN CANCER AND FOODS TO EAT TO REDUCE YOUR CHANCES OF EVER GETTING IF. 1 IN…

  • The skin cancer epidemic is not being driven by sunlight
    Articles,  Blog

    The skin cancer epidemic is not being driven by sunlight

    Hello. I’m Dr. Karen with Embrace Life Om and Mother Corps and in today’s video I’m going to be talking about the real cause of the skin cancer epidemic. This is part of a continuing series on Light and Your Health, and in order to better understand today’s video we highly recommend that you watch Part 3 in our series, The Hidden Hazards of Energy-Efficient lightbulbs. There are three main types of skin cancer: squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma. Of these three basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas are very common, but usually limited to the skin and are rarely fatal. Malignant melanoma is often limited…

  • Check-Up: Detecting Skin Cancer (Deanna Rucano, NP)
    Articles,  Blog

    Check-Up: Detecting Skin Cancer (Deanna Rucano, NP)

    When we see patients in primary care, a skin assessment is part of our routine. We definitely want to ask the patient if they have any new areas that are concerning. Any moles that have changed in size and color and in texture, if they’ve gotten larger. Have you experienced any weight loss? Has that particular area that’s bothering you, has it felt different? Is it itchy? Is it painful? If we decide that these are trouble areas, we can refer our accordingly to dermatology if we do think that we are visualizing something that could be cancerous. Different types of skin cancer do have specific characteristics, and we can…