French Manicure On My Mum – Sculpted Nail Tutorial
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French Manicure On My Mum – Sculpted Nail Tutorial


Kirsty: Hi everybody, I’m Kirsty Meakin from Naio Nails. In this video, I’m gonna show you how to do a full set of French Nails on my mother. So, if you look at my mom’s nails, can you tell we are the same family? Look at our hands. We are very similar. Kirsty: Yeah, *
Mom: My * older. Mum: Mine are a little bit more wrinkly.
Kirsty: Oh, they’re not. They’re beautiful hands. Adam: They’ve got more experience.
Kirsty: Yes! Mom: I’ll go for that. Kirsty: So, my mom’s already got nails and my mom just want to grow her nails a bit. So, we’re gonna keep that length, but we’re gonna extend them a little bit, aren’t we? Kirsty: Because you don’t want them to long, do you?
Mom: No. No, I don’t want pointy ones. Kirsty: You don’t want point…
Mom: I don’t want Fay ones. Kirsty: We are not gonna do Fay nails, not today. Kirsty: Because you do gardening and all that kind of stuff, don’t you? So, we don’t, can’t have them too long.
Mom: No. Kirsty: So, I’m gonna keep the length and I’m gonna sculpt out. So, I’m gonna put a form on because we’re gonna just make these a little bit longer. Not massively longer but we do want to add a little bit of length. So, do you reckon, mum, if we go sort of halfway between… Kirsty: …would you want to go to the one?
Mom: Yeah, that’s…yeah. Kirsty: Is that one alright?
Mon: That’s fine. Kirsty: Yeah! So, when you’re doing this, you need to make sure that the form fits nice and flush to that natural nail. We have done a video just dedicated to this kind of thing where you wanna keep the length underneath. Because you do have clients that want to keep the length but you can’t just keep filling and filling. I don’t really like that. I think doing three fills and then taking off the product and having a look what’s going on underneath and checking everything’s all tickety-boo and then re-sculpt them out. So, when I do a full set, I will…ooh! I will knock everything everywhere like always. I will put the forms on one hand first, do that and then, put the forms on the other hand because I think it’s a bit unfair sometimes, to incapacitate your client to the point where they’ll have sculpting forms on both hands and can’t do a single thing, and you know that they’re gonna move one of the hands and they’ll end up knocking the forms off. So, it’s kind of pointless putting them on because the forms will get disturbed. So, we’re gonna concentrate on this one first and then we’ll move on to the next one. I am going to dehydrate now. So, I’m gonna dehydrate that natural nail. Then I’m gonna use the Ultra Bond Acid Primer. Prime the nail so it’s ready for the acrylic application. We’re gonna be using Natural Beige and Mega White. Gonna start with these four first then I will come to the thumb and that’s because it’s gonna sit on its side and when I put the product on, I don’t want anything to run to the side, I don’t want it be disturbed because it’s in the position it’s in. These are all in the same position. It’s a lot easier to do these four first. And we’re gonna do a reverse application. So, that means we are going to do the nail bed extension first and we’re gonna get the smile line nice and neat before we actually do the white. So, in the old-fashioned days, when I was young, you used to put the white on first. I mean, we have got a video doing that. Adam: I just don’t get. I don’t get why you’d do the white first. Kirsty: It’s how they used to do it, Adam. I know it’s crazy, ain’t it?
Adam: I know. It seems like it would be much harder. Kirsty: Mmm!
Adam: But we’ve done the video, I remember that. Kirsty: Yeah!
Adam: It seems like it’s much harder to get that curve right… Kirsty: It is.
Adam: …in the opposite direction to what you’re doing now. Kirsty: It is definitely. This is a far easier way of doing a French because we can really neaten up this edge. Whereas, if we do it the old-fashioned way, you know, traditional way, shall we say, you have to keep sweeping into it like and it’s a lot harder and if you make any mistakes, you can’t hide it. So, I’ve pulled the pink about two mils shy of my mum’s natural nail, and I’m gonna put the white on. Oh, It’s a fuzzy! And we’re gonna walk that white up to each corner. That’s the first thing you need to do because the product is still moldable at this stage. And you want to butt it straight up to that smile line that you’ve created. We’re just gonna do like a tapered square. So, we’ll come in at the sides and have a flat end. It’s not really a ballerina because it’s not gonna have massive C-curve. The shorter the nail, the less of a c-curve you can actually get away with. Because it’s shorter, it doesn’t need quite as much support. One thing that I’m gonna do is, use Natural just to marry those colours together. So, if there’s any kind of little dips in there, it’ll just get filled in with that. You could use Clear but I want a tiny bit of colour. So, it’s important to be able to pick up the same size bead each time as well and that’s due to the angle of the brush going into the powder. So, if you change the angle of the brush going into the powder, you’re gonna have a different size bead. So, a little bit of fuzzy there again. And the shorter the nail, the lower the apex can be as well because it doesn’t need to have as much support because it’s shorter. Adam: How is it you’re not not pinching? Kirsty: I am.
Adam: Could… You are. Alright. Adam: I’ll shut up then.
Kirsty: Yeah. Kirsty: So, I’m gonna put Pinching Tool on here and it’s only really gonna touch those sides. Kirsty: Can you see how it’s not really touching…
Adam: The white. Kirsty: …the white?
Adam: So, could you decide, right, okay, I’m gonna do all of the pink first Adam: …and then all of the white afterwards.
Kirsty: You could do and I have done that before. Kirsty: But if you do that, then you can’t really pinch the pink. But when you’re doing a short nail, you don’t always necessarily have to pinch that pink. Adam: You could though, couldn’t you? Because you could just do one pink and the the next pink Adam: …and pinch the one before the one you’re working on.
Kirsty: Yeah, you could pinch the pink like that but you couldn’t pinch the whole structure… Adam: The whole thing, yeah.
Kirsty: …yeah, at the same time, but yes, you can do it that way. Kirsty: So, this Natural’s only actually a tiny bead and it’s quite wet. Just sort of filling in any gaps and to be honest, a majority of that will be filed away. Now, I can come back to this. So, you’ll see after each stage, so when I’ve done this, I’ve pinched this one. When I’ve done the white, I’ve come back to this one and then I can pinch with my fingers. I can pinch the end and we can take this form off now. So, we will still get a little bit of a C-curve in there, but it doesn’t need to be a great big wapping C-curve. Slightly bigger bead. So I went a little bit lower in the powder. So, the angle of my brush was lower because we’re doing the thumb. Kirsty: When I was young, mum, what did you think I was gonna grow up and be? What do you think I was gonna be when I was older? Mum: A pain in the butt.
Kirsty: Well I definitely did do that. I grow up and I was a pain in the butt. Mum: I was right.
Kirsty: Yes, you were completely right, mum. Adam: She’s right there. Mum: No, an artist of some form.
Kirsty: Yeah. Mum: Yeah.
Kirsty: Did I always show that I had some kind of talent? Mum: Yeah, you did. Kirsty: Keep blowing the trumpet, mum. Kirsty: Come on, I need some confidence boost.
Mum: Yeah! You granddad always said you were going to be an artist, didn’t he? Kirsty: Mm-hmm!
Mum: Yeah. Mum: I don’t think he thought it was gonna be on nails.
Kirsty: Oh, yeah. Kirsty: So, it’s a bit different canvas.
Mum: Yes. I think he wanted you to go into ceramics. Kirsty: Yes.
Mum: Yes, ceramic artist. Kirsty: He did. Because where we’re from, which is Stoke-On-Trent, is known, you know, as the Potteries and the pottery industry was very big and you worked in Pot banks, didn’t you, mum? Mum: Oh, yes!
Kirsty: We call them Pot Banks… Mum: Pot banks, yeah,
Kirsty: …is where they make all the pottery. Mum: Worked for Wedgwood.
Kirsty: What differently places… Kirsty: Wedgwood, yeah.
Mum: Yeah. Kirsty: Who else?
Mum: Just Wedgwood. Kirsty: Really, just Wedgwood?
Mum: Yeah. Kirsty: You did not work for anybody else?
Mum: No, only Wedgwood, yeah. Mum: Guilding. Adam: What’s guilding? Mum: It’s applying gold…
Adam: Mm-hmm! Mum: to…
Adam: All you’ve got? Mum: …with a brush
Adam: Mm-hmm! Mom: …to plates, cups… Adam: She must have a steady hand.
Mum: Vased Kirsty: Mm-hmm!
Mum: …all kinds of things. Doing guilding handles, make it…doing patterns on the sides of vases. Kirsty: Can you still do that then?
Mum: It’s mostly on machines, I think. Kirsty: Oh, It’s mostly on done now machines.
Mum: I think so. Kirsty: Yes, so, you’ve got a steady hand, don’t you, mum? Mum: Used to. Kirsty: What was your favourite thing to do then, when you were at work? Kirsty: Apart from gasbag talk to your mates.
Mum: I was gonna say, Favourite thing to do was to go on a break. Mum: I can’t tell you what my favourite thing was. Kirsty: Well, you’re not still employed by them, so…
Mum: But we did take a TV with us. Kirsty: What?! Kirsty: You took a TV.
Mum: I took a TV. Kirsty: What, on your break?
Mum: Yeah. Kirsty: Would you mean…
Mum: No, generally. Kirsty: Got messy.
Mum: We were messy with the mini TV. Kirsty: With the mini TV.
Mum: We were working at the same time, yes. Kirsty: Right, yeah.
Mum: This is when we’ve got no work. Kirsty: You got no work on.
Mum: No, so they couldn’t find us anywhere, so we had to go count prints. Kirsty: When you’ve got no work on, you had to count prints.
Mum: We went to count prints, the letter graphing prints. Kirsty: Oh, that was what you were apparently doing?
Mum: We were counting them as well as watching TV. We can multitask. Kirsty: Yeah. So, I’m just putting the forms on the other hand and just doing, you know, it’s pretty much exactly the same as what we’ve just done. So, the ones that is still about are like Steelite. Kirsty: Aren’t they, mum? Steelites. Still very busy, ain’t it?
Mum: Yeah, they do hotel ware. Kirsty: Yeah! So, like, I’ve been to America and been into one of like, a typical American diner and turned over the plates and they were Steelite. Kirsty: So, they were…
Adam: Based here? Kirsty: … they were made in Stoke, yeah. Kirsty: But all the decorative stuff like, Dalton’s and Wedgwood and there’s Moorcroft’s still. Kirsty: Here isn’t it?
Mum: Yeah. Kirsty: Who else is there?
Adam: So, why…what was the reason for all of the pottery here? Adam: Why Stoke-On-Trent, why this area?
Kirsty: Built on clay. Adam: Is that what it is? Adam: Right.
Kirsty: Yeah. Adam: My, where I grew is is…
Kirsty: it was all clay. Adam: …was coal mines. Kirsty: Yeah.
Adam: …was built on coal. Kirsty: Yeah. Mum: Well, I mean, they had a lot coal mines here, so it was…
Kirsty: Yeah. Mum: …mainly mines. There was steel. Kirsty: Yeah.
Mum: And then, the pottery. Kirsty: But it was like, pretty much, you know, what would you say at least half of the female population, if not more, worked on a pot plant, don’t they? Mum: I’m not sure.
Kirsty: There’s a lot of, you know… Mum: Yeah, there was. Kirsty: Because there was that many jobs.
Mum: Everybody. Kirsty: there were massive factories, weren’t they?
Mum: Yeah, you just go in and get a job. Kirsty: Take on anybody, so my mom got a job. Mum: Take on anybody. Kirsty: So, I’m just gonna apply the product exactly same as I have before and now, I’ve actually got something to look at. So, I can look at the previous hand that I’ve done and try to match up the smile lines as well. So, you know, I’ve got a visual to look at. Don’t have to visualise it as much. But it is good to visualise what you’re creating in your head before you actually do it. So, I’m gonna do my normal filing routine. Getting my sidewalls nice and straight, then I’ll go around the cuticle area. My mother absolutely hates this part. Adam: You don’t like the noise?
Mum: It’s awful. I don’t like the feeling. Mum: I don’t like… I just don’t like it. Kirsty: So, I’m gonna use an electric file. Adam: You don’t mind the electric file. Mum: I don’t like the electric file but I prefer the electric file than…
Kirsty: Than a hand-file. Mum: …a hand-file because I don’t like either. I don’t like the filing with the normal file, hand-file, no. Kirsty: So, I’m gonna go over and remove the bulk and what you’ll see is that, I will hit the white and the pink and it’ll give you a nice crisp smile line. And that was my own nail I was filing there. I will still need to go over the nail with the file though. Sorry, mom. Mum: Oh!
Kirsty: But not as much as I would have had I not done this. Kirsty: So, I’m checking the side view, making sure I still got a nice apex. Checking down the barrel, making sure I’m removing the bulk. And I’m just refining this a little bit further. I’m sorry, mom. Sorry! I’ve just got a 240-grit file now just to smooth it a little bit. If I still need to remove any bulk, I’ll go to a 180 file because I know that’s gonna remove bulk but also it’s not gonna eat into it and remove too much. So, it is really important to have lots of different grits of files. And I’m gonna do this on all of them. So, once they’re all buffed nice and smooth, we’re gonna wipe over with Gel Residue Wipe-off Solution. Make sure they’re nice and clean and then, we will topcoat them. Kirsty: Look at them.
Mum: Lovely! Kirsty: So, this is the Urban Graffiti Top Coat. It has no sticky layer, which is great. Makes it nice and quick. You have to wipe off, no sticky layer. Pop me that in the lamp for me, mother. Once they’re cured, we’re gonna put some Cuticle Oil on. Beautiful salon pink and whites for my mother dear. Kirsty: They look nice, mom, they do.
Mum: Mm-hmm! Lovely. Kirsty: Suit you they do.
Mum: Yeah! Kirsty: I don’t think I’ve done a French on you for a very long time.
Mum: Very long time. Kirsty: Very long time.
Mum: I know. Kirsty: It’s beautiful. Kirsty: Can’t get over how identical our hands are.
Mum: I know. I know. Kirsty: How identical are they? All the freckles and wrinkles and everything. There you are, guys. I hope you’ve enjoyed this video. Don’t forget, check us out on Facebook and Instagram. Please, subscribe to the channel and I’ll see you in the next video. Kirsty: Bye-bye! Say bye-bye, mum.
Mum: Bye! Kirsty: Oh dear!
Adam: throw it all over as well. Kirsty: Sorry, mum. Adam: we’re going to have to do a YouTube…
Mum: Yeah. Adam: On what? Litho… Kirsty: Lithographing.
Mum: Lithographing. Adam: Lithographing, right.
Kirsty: Lithographings are kind of like, Kirsty: the tattoos when you were a kid?
Adam: Yeah. Mum: Yeah.
Kirsty: And you wet them and put them on. Mum: Yeah. Adam: Right!
Kirsty: Kind of like that. Mum: And then…
Adam: So, if you put your arm in the oven, it would stay on? Kirsty: yeah
Mum: You had to get all the bubbles out.

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